Aug. 1, 2019

I TOOK A LOOK AT THE BOOK-- AND THE BOOK TOOK A LOOK-BACK AT ME.

THE NEW YORK TIMES

July 28, 1945:

"A twin-engine B-25 Army bomber lost in a blinding fog, crashed into the Empire State Building today at a point 975 feet above the street level.  Thirteen people, including the three occupants of the plane and ten persons at work within the building, were killed in the catastrophe, and 26 people were injured."

The book's author, Arthur Weingarten, was ten years old at the time.  He arrived at the scene with his father, a New York City Fire Marshal and the impact of that horrible tragedy was unforgettable. 

Forty years later, when I spoke with Betty Lou Oliver, the building's elevator operator who survived despite having almost every bone in her body broken...she could barely talk about the incident.  Even today, she remains traumatized by her near-death experience.

Until I read the book---THE SKY IS FALLING---I had no idea that a government plane had nearly toppled the Empire State Building.  I was completely ignorant of the fact that an Arkansas woman had endured such a close encounter with death.

This book is beautifully written.  It offers details, facts, and marks an historic event that teachers never teach nor history books ever reveal.  Read it and learn what you never knew---------------------------------------

I love to read. I've been reading since I was three years old.  I quickly moved from funny books and children’s books to timeless classics--- like LITTLE LORD FAUNTLEROY, LITTLE WOMEN, HEIDI, QUEEN VICTORIA and on and on.  I spent a great amount of time with ENCYCLOPEDIAS and eventually added MEDICAL JOURNALS to my literary repertoire. That where I learned "The Facts of Life."

I believe Books are priceless treasures that consistently educate, inform, inspire, and encourage readers to challenge life’s endless possibilities.  

I'm  a “SAVE THE BOOKS” advocate.  Sure, books take up space, get dusty, and are expensive to pack and move each time we relocate our lives BUT…there’s a certain “closeness” that only occurs when you touch-- then open a book-- turn its pages, view its pictures/drawings/illustrations, then physically close it.

 Like a long-time friend-- a book waits patiently for you to reconnect—to reach out and touch it again--regardless of the years--and to once again--offer it your full attention.