Jan. 10, 2020

NEVER ASSUME YOU KNOW EVERYTHING BECAUSE YOU'RE ALL-GROWN-UP!

Reflecting on my long work history....it seems--through the years-- that every one of my jobs involved a commute. It’s a different way of life and, as a daily commuter, I soon learned the importance of timing. The old sayings “You learn by doing” or “Experience is the best teacher” are both true.

 Shortly after beginning life as a regular commuter, I was reprimanded, on two occasions, for being late to work. In an effort to avoid being late in the future, I began allowing extra time for bad weather, highway accidents, car trouble, even suicidal drivers.

Morning after morning, it was not only my responsibility to get myself dressed and ready for work but to also get my two young daughters up, dressed, fed, and ready to attend two different schools. Looking back… every morning seemed the equivalent of running a marathon; each day was a race with the clock to get everyone to their appointed destinations—prepared and on-time.

Driving the highway five days a week, I felt much like a race car driver in-training. Each day I focused on my destination, but a few times, I was distracted by reality.

One morning---the traffic was particularly heavy and I found myself stuck behind a yellow school bus. The bus appeared crowded and I noticed many students riding backwards, looking out the rear windows. The students staring in my direction were smiling and--impressed to see such pleasant, smiling faces--I smiled back. I tried waving several times but the students only smiled. Perhaps their instructors had warned them against waving or appearing too friendly with motorists. For whatever reason, the students stayed in their seats and just smiled.

For approximately ten miles I followed the bus and, childish as it sounds, I felt a little slighted that the students had ignored my attempts to be friendly.

 When the traffic eventually lightened, I passed the bus and instantly-- felt ashamed. Printed on the side of the Yellow School Bus in large black letters was the name of the school:

ARKANSAS SCHOOL FOR THE BLIND.

 

PS… I learned a valuable lesson that day.

Sally Miller